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All Categories > High Temperature Resistant Alloys > Inconel® Alloy 718 > Item # 718-BAR-2  

Item # 718-BAR-2, Inconel® Alloy 718

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Inconel® Alloy 718 (UNS N07718) Ni 52.5, Cr 19.0 Fe 18.5 Mo 3.0 Nb+Ta 3.6
Excellent strength from -423 °F to 1300 °F (-253 °C to 705 °C). Age hardenable and may be welded in fully aged condition, excellent oxidation resistance up to 1800 °F (980 °C).
Jet engines, pump bodies and parts, rocket motors and thrust reversers, nuclear fuel element spacers, hot extrusion tooling.

Gamma Prime strengthened alloy with excellent mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, as well as cryogenic temperatures. Suitable for temperatures up to around 1300 °F. Can be readily worked and age hardened.

Excellent strength from -423 °F to 1300 °F (-253 °C to 705 °C). Age hardenable and may be welded in fully aged condition, Excellent oxidation resistance up to 1800 °F (980 °C). Typically sold in the solution annealed temper, but can be ordered aged, cold worked, or cold worked & aged.





Specifications  · Physical  · Mechanical  · Nominal Chemistry  · General Resistance  · Machinability Ratings  · Machining Section  · Applications

Specifications

Type

Bar

Size

2.000

Alloy

718


Physical

Density

0.296 lb/in³

Specific Heat

0.104 Btu/lb ºF

Electrical Resistivity

Aged: 725 ohm/cir-mil-ft
Annealed: 753 ohm/cir-mil-ft

Curie Temperature

Aged: -170 ºF
Annealed: <-320 ºF

Melting Range

2300 - 2437 ºF

Thermal Expansion (x 10-6 in/in/Deg F)

7.1 (70 - 200 F)


Mechanical

Mechanical Type

Aged
Annealed

Tensile Strength

Aged: 180 ksi
Annealed: 125000 psi

Yield Strength

Aged: 150 ksi
Annealed: 60000 psi

Elongation

Aged: 12%
Annealed: 51%

Hardness

Annealed: Rc 36
Annealed: Equivalent
Aged: C36


Nominal Chemistry

Ni

52.5 min.

Fe

bal.

Cr

19

Co

1 max

Mo

3

Cu

0.30 max

Al

0.5

Mn

0.35 max

Si

0.35 max

Ti

0.9

C

0.05

Other

5 Cb + Ta


General Resistance

General Resistance

Corrosion
Temperature / Oxidation

UNS

N07718

Werkstof

2.4668

Sheet/Plate USA

Aged: AMS 5596
Aged: B670
Annealed: AMS 5596
Annealed: B670

Bar/Rod USA

Aged: B637
Aged: AMS 5663
Aged: AMS 5664
Annealed: AMS 5662
Annealed: B637

Forging USA

Aged: B637
Aged: AMS 5663
Aged: AMS 5664
Aged: AMS 5832
Annealed: B637
Annealed: AMS 5662

Weld Wire

A5.14 ERNiFeCr-2


Machinability Ratings

Speed Surface

Aged: 40 ft/mm
Annealed: 20 ft/mm

Speed % of B1112

Aged: 24
Annealed: 12

Note

These machinability ratios must be recognized as approximate values. They are a reasonable guide to relative tool life and lower required for cutting. It is obvious, however, that variables of speed, cutting oil, feed and depth of cut will significantly affect these ratios.


Machining Section
The alloys described here work harden rapidly during machining and require more power to cut than do the plain carbon steels. The metal is ‘gummy,’ with chips that tend to be stringy and tough. Machine tools should be rigid and used to no more than 75% of their rated capacity. Both work piece and tool should be held rigidly; tool overhang should be minimized. Rigidity is particularly important when machining titanium, as titanium has a much lower modulus of elasticity than either steel or nickel alloys. Slender work pieces of titanium tend to deflect under tool pressures causing chatter, tool rubbing and tolerance problems.

Make sure that tools are always sharp. Change to sharpened tools at regular intervals rather than out of necessity. Titanium chips in particular tend to gall and weld to the tool cutting edges, speeding up tool wear and failure. Remember- cutting edges, particularly throw-away inserts, are expendable. Don't trade dollars in machine time for pennies in tool cost.

Feed rate should be high enough to ensure that the tool cutting edge is getting under the previous cut thus avoiding work-hardened zones. Slow speeds are generally required with heavy cuts. Sulfur chlorinated petroleum oil lubricants are suggested for all alloys but titanium. Such lubricants may be thinned with paraffin oil for finish cuts at higher speeds. The tool should not ride on the work piece as this will work harden the material and result in early tool dulling or breakage. Use an air jet directed on the tool when dry cutting, to significantly increase tool life.

Lubricants or cutting fluids for titanium should be carefully selected. Do not use fluids containing chlorine or other halogens (fluorine, bromine or iodine), in order to avoid risk of corrosion problems. The speeds are for single point turning operations using high speed steel tools. This information is provided as a guide to relative machinability, higher speeds are used with carbide tooling.



Applications
Uses for this alloy tend to be in the field of gas turbine components and cryogenic storage tanks. Jet engines, pump bodies and parts, rocket motors and thrust reversers, nuclear fuel element spacers, hot extrusion tooling. Other popular uses are high strength bolting, and down hole shafting.



 
   
 
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